Thursday, February 25, 2016

Today's Elder Care / Senior Care Q&A is about Medicaid Eligibility

Medicaid


QUESTION:  Special Needs, Third Party and Self Settled Trusts – What’s with all the Names?


ANSWER:  When a person applies for Medicaid eligibility there are many pitfalls that an unsuspecting or unsophisticated applicant can run afoul of. To help them retain the benefit of certain monies that they would normally have access to third parties or the applicant themselves can create a special needs trust to help keep the public benefits and still benefit from the money in the trust. The various different trusts have different legal requirements that must be met to qualify as that type of trusts.


Moreover, different trusts accomplish different goals and yet other types of trusts exist that have nothing to do with Medicaid or other public entitlement program eligibility but help to reduce tax liability. Some trusts accomplish two tasks, such as a third party special needs trusts, which allow seniors to live a relatively modest and respectable life and qualify for Medicaid at the same time. While other types of trusts only satisfy just one legal goal, such as a grantor retained annuity trust, which allows a person to make a gift of an asset that will likely appreciate rather quickly, but incur no gift tax liability. Finally, there are other types of trusts that outlive their utility, such as pooled trusts.


SPECIAL NEEDS TRUSTS – APPLY TO MEDICAID ELIGIBILITY


Special needs trusts are trusts that allow for a person to benefit from public entitlement programs, such as Medicare or Medicaid, without running afoul of statutory asset limits. To help parse through some of the confusion with respect to the different types of trusts as they apply to Medicaid eligibility it is best to understand the various types of trusts. Under the umbrella of special needs trust there are two general distinctions. The distinctions arise as a result of the answer to the question of who had the right to the money immediately prior to its deposit into the trust. For example, a father may leave money to his daughter in a will.


If that money is given to her outright and she then deposits that money into a trust, it is a self-settled trust. If the will leaves the money to the daughter via a trust, it is a third party trust. In either event the daughter benefits from the money. In the case of leaving the money outright, she can use all, some or none of the money for whatever she chooses. In the case of leaving the money to the trust, the trustee acts as a fiduciary and according to the terms of the trust with respect to whether she can use all, some or none of the money as she chooses. As such, if immediately prior to deposit of the funds into the trust, the money can be used solely at the discretion of the beneficiary, it is a self settled trust. If immediately prior to deposit of the funds into the trust, the money cannot be used at the sole discretion of the beneficiary, it is a third party trust.


  • Self settled special needs trust characteristics:
    • Must include a proviso that pays the state the full amount left in the trust at the time that the beneficiary passes away, but no more than what the state is due.

    • Have limitations on what the trustee is permitted to pay for. These conditions vary from state to state and even county to county.

    • The trust must be for the sole benefit of the beneficiary (except a residuary beneficiary which may be entitled to whatever is in the trust after the state is repaid 100 percent of it’s own expenditures).


  • Third party special needs trust characteristics
    • The Medicaid beneficiary may be one of several beneficiaries.

    • Beneficiaries may even include charities.

    • The trust may terminate if the beneficiary improves and no longer needs Medicaid or other public entitlement program (such as SSI).


Expenditures to the beneficiary may reduce the monthly benefit amount depending on various factors.


Today’s Answer was provided by Michael Ettinger, Esq., from the Ettinger Law Firm in Albany, New York.  Mr. Ettinger is a Partner Member in the national ElderCare Matters Alliance.


21 “Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories


If you need help in planning for and/or dealing with this issue or with any Elder Care / Senior Care matter, you can find the professional help you need in one of the following 21Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories. These Elder Care / Senior Care – specific Directories are sponsored by the National ElderCare Matters Alliance, an organization of thousands of America’s TOP Elder Care / Senior Care Professsionals who help families plan for and deal with a wide range of Elder Care Matters.



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Today"s Elder Care / Senior Care Q&A is about Medicaid Eligibility

Today's Elder Care / Senior Care Q&A is about Medicaid Eligibility

QUESTION:  Special Needs, Third Party and Self Settled Trusts – What’s with all the Names?


ANSWER:  When a person applies for Medicaid eligibility there are many pitfalls that an unsuspecting or unsophisticated applicant can run afoul of. To help them retain the benefit of certain monies that they would normally have access to third parties or the applicant themselves can create a special needs trust to help keep the public benefits and still benefit from the money in the trust. The various different trusts have different legal requirements that must be met to qualify as that type of trusts.


Moreover, different trusts accomplish different goals and yet other types of trusts exist that have nothing to do with Medicaid or other public entitlement program eligibility but help to reduce tax liability. Some trusts accomplish two tasks, such as a third party special needs trusts, which allow seniors to live a relatively modest and respectable life and qualify for Medicaid at the same time. While other types of trusts only satisfy just one legal goal, such as a grantor retained annuity trust, which allows a person to make a gift of an asset that will likely appreciate rather quickly, but incur no gift tax liability. Finally, there are other types of trusts that outlive their utility, such as pooled trusts.


SPECIAL NEEDS TRUSTS – APPLY TO MEDICAID ELIGIBILITY


Special needs trusts are trusts that allow for a person to benefit from public entitlement programs, such as Medicare or Medicaid, without running afoul of statutory asset limits. To help parse through some of the confusion with respect to the different types of trusts as they apply to Medicaid eligibility it is best to understand the various types of trusts. Under the umbrella of special needs trust there are two general distinctions. The distinctions arise as a result of the answer to the question of who had the right to the money immediately prior to its deposit into the trust. For example, a father may leave money to his daughter in a will.


If that money is given to her outright and she then deposits that money into a trust, it is a self-settled trust. If the will leaves the money to the daughter via a trust, it is a third party trust. In either event the daughter benefits from the money. In the case of leaving the money outright, she can use all, some or none of the money for whatever she chooses. In the case of leaving the money to the trust, the trustee acts as a fiduciary and according to the terms of the trust with respect to whether she can use all, some or none of the money as she chooses. As such, if immediately prior to deposit of the funds into the trust, the money can be used solely at the discretion of the beneficiary, it is a self settled trust. If immediately prior to deposit of the funds into the trust, the money cannot be used at the sole discretion of the beneficiary, it is a third party trust.


  • Self settled special needs trust characteristics:
    • Must include a proviso that pays the state the full amount left in the trust at the time that the beneficiary passes away, but no more than what the state is due.

    • Have limitations on what the trustee is permitted to pay for. These conditions vary from state to state and even county to county.

    • The trust must be for the sole benefit of the beneficiary (except a residuary beneficiary which may be entitled to whatever is in the trust after the state is repaid 100 percent of it’s own expenditures).


  • Third party special needs trust characteristics
    • The Medicaid beneficiary may be one of several beneficiaries.

    • Beneficiaries may even include charities.

    • The trust may terminate if the beneficiary improves and no longer needs Medicaid or other public entitlement program (such as SSI).


Expenditures to the beneficiary may reduce the monthly benefit amount depending on various factors.


Today’s Answer was provided by Michael Ettinger, Esq., from the Ettinger Law Firm in Albany, New York.  Mr. Ettinger is a Partner Member in the national ElderCare Matters Alliance.


21 “Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories


If you need help in planning for and/or dealing with this issue or with any Elder Care / Senior Care matter, you can find the professional help you need in one of the following 21Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories. These Elder Care / Senior Care – specific Directories are sponsored by the National ElderCare Matters Alliance, an organization of thousands of America’s TOP Elder Care / Senior Care Professsionals who help families plan for and deal with a wide range of Elder Care Matters.



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Today"s Elder Care / Senior Care Q&A is about Medicaid Eligibility

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

Today's Elder Care / Senior Care Q&A for 2/24/2016

 


QUESTION:  What are our rights to refills if Medicare drops coverage of our prescription drugs?


ANSWER:  Medicare prescription drug plans can change which drugs they cover, leaving you without coverage for a drug you need. Or you may switch plans into a plan that doesn’t cover your medication. In these circumstances, Medicare drug plans are required to offer you a 30-day transition supply of the drug you were taking.


All Medicare drug plans, including Medicare Advantage plans with prescription drug coverage and stand-alone drug plans, must offer these transition refills. Plans must provide a 30-day supply (unless a lesser amount is prescribed) of an ongoing medication within the first 90 days of plan membership or within the first 90 days of the new contract year. The plans are also required to provide written notice that you are using your transition supply and explaining what your rights are.


You are entitled to a transition refill when you first enroll in a Part D plan, if you move to a new plan that does not cover your current medication, when your current plan drops your medication or imposes new restrictions on the drug, or when you experience a change in your level of care (e.g., a move from a hospital to a nursing home). The 30-day supply is designed to give you time to either talk to your doctor and find a substitute medication or to request a coverage exception from your current plan. If you ask for a coverage exception, your plan must provide temporary refills until the request has been processed.


Residents in long-term care facilities get additional protections. If you are in a long-term care facility, the plan must cover all the 31-day refill requests you submit in the first 90 days on the plan. After the first 90 days, the plan must offer an emergency 31-day supply if your request for an exception has not been processed.


Today’s Answer was provided by Chad R. Oldham, Esq., from the Oldham Law Firm in Jonesboro, Arkansas.  Mr. Oldham is a Partner Member in the national ElderCare Matters Alliance.


21 “Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories


If you need help in planning for and/or dealing with this issue or with any Elder Care / Senior Care matter, you can find the professional help you need in one of the following 21Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories. These Elder Care / Senior Care – specific Directories are sponsored by the National ElderCare Matters Alliance, an organization of thousands of America’s TOP Elder Care / Senior Care Professsionals who help families plan for and deal with a wide range of Elder Care Matters.



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Today"s Elder Care / Senior Care Q&A for 2/24/2016

Tuesday, February 23, 2016

This Week's Elder Care / Senior Care Article

 


TITLE:  A Cautionary Tale… Protect Your Hard Earned Money


In the land of opportunity, many people have “made it” and made it big. Mr. Roman Blum did just that. However, having amassed close to 40 million dollars, he died last year at the age of 97 with no apparent heirs to his fortune. According to the state comptroller’s office, Mr. Blum’s estate is the largest unclaimed estate in New York State history. His story illustrates how critical it is to engage in estate planning.


 


Mr. Blum was born in Poland. Having survived the Holocaust, he met and married his wife, also a Holocaust survivor, after the war. They migrated to the United States and settled in Forest Hills. He was a real estate developer who seized the opportunity to develop land in Staten Island when the Verrazano Bridge opened in 1964. He ultimately moved to Staten Island himself. He and his wife never had any children. It was said that the former Mrs. Blum suffered from infertility after being a subject of Dr. Mengele’s experiments while she was held in Auschwitz. The couple eventually divorced and Mrs. Blum later died in 1992. Mr. Blum was said to have had a wife and children in Poland before the war, but there is no evidence of any surviving relatives.


 


In a case like that of Mr. Blum, in which no will was found, the estate will be distributed according to the laws of intestacy. This means that the estate will go through an “administration proceeding” where an administrator (the equivalent of an executor in a will) is appointed to handle the estate. The following list of individuals may petition to be the administrator of the decedent’s estate:


(a)  surviving spouse, (b)  children, (c)  grandchildren, (d)  father or mother, (e)  brothers or sisters, (f)  other persons who are distributees (entitled to receive under the law).


 


If none of the above individuals exist, the Public Administrator of the county will be appointed. Currently, the Richmond County Public Administrator’s office is handling the estate of Mr. Blum. The Public Administrator is charged with collecting his assets, selling them, and paying the appropriate federal and New York State estate taxes. The Public Administrator is also conducting a thorough search for a will, and is hiring a genealogist in an effort to find Mr. Blum’s relatives. If any relatives are found, the order of individuals entitled to inherit from Mr. Blum’s estate is as follows:


  1. surviving spouse and descendants (children, grandchildren, etc);

  2. surviving parents;

  3. surviving descendants of parents (i.e. siblings, nephews and nieces);

  4. surviving grandparents or the descendants of grandparents (i.e. uncles, aunts, and cousins)

 


If no will is found and no relatives are located, Mr. Blum’s estate will be turned over to the New York City Department of Finance. After three years, if no relatives come forward, the funds will then go to the New York State Comptroller’s office as unclaimed funds. If any relatives ever surface, all the funds will be returned.


 


Mr. Blum’s case is a stunning example of the importance of engaging in estate planning. Even if you do have close relatives, it is imperative to take control of your own estate. Why have New York State determine who your beneficiaries will be? Be proactive and make sure that you have a well-prepared will, power of attorney, statutory gifts rider, health care proxy, living will, and living trust. If Mr. Blum had planned ahead, he could have specified in a will that his estate would go to charitable organizations serving Holocaust survivors. Or, he could have engaged in more complex estate planning to avoid or minimize estate taxes and provide for an extensive list of beneficiaries.


This article was written by Ronald A. Fatoullah, Esq, CELA, managing attorney of Ronald Fatoullah & Associates in Great Neck, New York.  Mr. Fatoullah is a Partner member of the national ElderCare Matters Alliance.


21 “Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories


If you need help in planning for and/or dealing with your estate plan or with any Elder Care / Senior Care issue, you can find the professional help you need in one of the following 21Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories. These Elder Care / Senior Care – specific Directories are sponsored by the National ElderCare Matters Alliance, an organization of thousands of America’s TOP Elder Care / Senior Care Professsionals who help families plan for and deal with a wide range of Elder Care Matters.


  1. ElderCareMatters.com

  2. ElderCareMattersBlog.com

  3. ElderCareWebsites.com

  4. ElderCareAnswers.us

  5. ElderCareArticles.us

  6. ElderCareProfessionals.us

  7. ElderLawAttorneys.us

  8. EstatePlanningAttorneys.us

  9. FindDailyMoneyManagers.net

  10. FindElderCareMediators.net

  11. FindElderLawAttorneys.net

  12. FindEstatePlanningAttorneys.net

  13. FindGeriatricCareManagers.net

  14. FindHomeCareProviders.net

  15. FindLongTermCareInsurance.net

  16. FindMedicaidAttorneys.net

  17. FindProbateAttorneys.net

  18. FindSeniorLivingCommunities.net

  19. FindSeniorMoveManagers.net

  20. FindSpecialNeedsAttorneys.net

  21. FindVAAccreditedAttorneys.net

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This Week"s Elder Care / Senior Care Article

Monday, February 22, 2016

Today’s Elder Care / Senior Care Q&A for Monday 2/22/2016

QUESTION:  Is it ethical for an Elder Law Attorney to have his fees paid by a client’s daughter, while preparing documents that benefit that daughter?


ANSWER:   This is a very complex issue that is not uncommon for Attorneys practicing in the area of Elder Law. Frequently a large portion of the interaction about an elderly Clients matters are handled by a designated child or third party. This is just the reality of dealing with someone who has failed to plan properly and no longer has the energy or physical ability to actively participate in every step of the process. The payment of legal fees for someone else is also not uncommon. Children frequently pay for the planning and documents for their elderly parents because they are the ones who will be left to deal with the problems.


The question implies possible lack of capacity. First capacity is generally a legal determination not a medical one, whether legal capacity exists depends also upon what they are doing as there are many forms of capacity. Age or a diagnosis of an illness do NOT establish lack of capacity. Each type of legal capacity has set elements which must be met to determine capacity.


The disparity in treatment in types and amounts of bequests is also very common especially with the elderly. Unlike a younger couple who make equal distributions, the elderly frequently change that division. Whether it is because one child has spoken to them in 10 years, one child has been using them as the bank forever, one child loves them but sees them infrequently because they live far away, or one child has lives nearby and does their shopping, takes them to all their doctor visits, helps them deal with matters they no longer wish to do, there are many reasons for an unbalanced division.


In my office, in most types of cases we make it clear from day 1 that we represent the senior not the children. As a matter of course, my office takes precautions to prevent actual or the appearance of undue influence or lack of capacity. So if the senior proposes a radical shift from prior plans, has received a diagnosis of dementia or other illness or shows signs of loss of cognitive ability, or if the family relation is volatile, then we provide letters for the seniors physician to complete where the physician is required to give an opinion on the senior in regard to each of the required elements of capacity. At the time of the first meeting we always will spend a good portion of the meeting with just the senior, the attorney and a third member of the firm’s staff to take down notes and observations. At that point we asks questions designed to find factors suggesting potential undue influence, lack of capacity or a variance or uncertainty in regard to the senior’s distributive plan.


If we are comfortable that the senior has capacity and the plan presented is what the senior desires, then we will go forward with the plan but will also include specific separate written acknowledgements of any actual or appearance of conflict of interest, undue influence or lack of capacity which must be signed by the senior, other relevant family members, and usually of member of my firm.


So while on the face of it your facts appear to suggest some undue influence by your sister I would talk to her if you get along or to your father and discuss your concerns. Perhaps the Attorney is skilled in the area and has taken proper safeguards to make sure the plan is what your father wants and is not being controlled by your sister. If you cannot resolve it directly, then you should immediately retain an experienced Elder Law Attorney to assist you in determining and implementing the appropriate action whether it is an out of Court resolution or to bring an emergency guardianship proceeding to prevent your sister from continuing any undue influence and to have the Court determine any document prepared to be of no effect. If there is evidence indicating that the prior Attorney knowingly assisted your sister in any improper conduct, then file the appropriate complaint before your State Attorney ethics Board.


21 “Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories


If you need help in planning for and/or dealing with this issue or with any Elder Care / Senior Care matter, you can find the professional help you need in one of the following 21Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories. These Elder Care / Senior Care – specific Directories are sponsored by the National ElderCare Matters Alliance, an organization of thousands of America’s TOP Elder Care / Senior Care Professsionals who help families plan for and deal with a wide range of Elder Care Matters.




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Today’s Elder Care / Senior Care Q&A for Monday 2/22/2016

Monday, February 8, 2016

Today's Elder Care / Senior Care Q&A for Monday 2/8/2016

QUESTION: Would you please provide us with some information about Reverse Mortgages?


Answered by:
Reverse Mortgage

Beth Miller-Bornemann

Branch Manager & Reverse Mortgage Specialist

The Reverse Mortgage Group, A Branch of American Pacific Mortgage

Pleasant Hill, California
An ElderCare Matters Partner & California State Coordinator


ANSWER: It can be scary: making a major decision concerning your biggest investment, a decision involving a place that means the most to you. Deciding whether or not a reverse mortgage is right for you takes considerable thought and consideration. We hope the following questions and answers help you in this endeavor.


What is a reverse mortgage?


A reverse mortgage is a unique loan that allow homeowner(s) 62 years of age and older to draw on the equity in their home, which is paid to the homeowner(s) in a variety of payout options. One aspect of this loan is that it does not require repayment until the homeowner(s) no longer reside in the residence, the last surviving borrower passes away or does not comply with the loan program obligations such as paying property taxes and insurance, and maintaining the property to FHA guidelines. Regulated by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), this federally-insured loan helps those in the senior population meet their financial needs and may ease money worries for greater peace of mind.


Prior to applying for the loan, it is required that you are made aware of the terms and conditions of the loan through sources provided by HUD. Contact the Housing Counseling Clearinghouse at 1-800-569-4287 to obtain the name and telephone number of a HUD-approved counseling agency. You may also contact our office and we will provide you with the list of HUD-approved reverse mortgage counseling agencies.


Is my home eligible for a reverse mortgage?


Homes eligible for a reverse mortgage include single-family homes, detached homes, townhouses, and two-to-four unit properties that are owner-occupied. Condominiums must be FHA-approved.Some manufactured homes are eligible but must meet FHA guidelines. Contact your loan officer for more details on manufactured home eligibility.


What are the differences between a home equity loan and a reverse mortgage?


Reverse mortgages have become more popular because they allow the borrower to receive loan proceeds that do not require immediate repayment as long as you remain in your home as your primary residence, do not sell your home, at least one borrower lives in the home and follow loan guidelines. On the other hand, obtaining a home equity loan (or home equity line of credit or second mortgage) requires that you have sufficient income to cover the debt- plus, you must continue to make monthly principal and interest mortgage payments. With a reverse mortgage you do not make monthly principal and interest payments. Keep in mind you must continue to pay all property related fees, taxes and homeowner’s insurance and maintain the property in good condition.


How much cash can I expect to get?


The cash you can potentially receive is based on the age of the youngest borrower, the current expected interest rate, the mortgage option selected, amount of home equity and the appraised value of the home. For instance an older individual with a higher value home typically will be eligible for more than a younger person with the same home value at the same expected interest rate. How much money you can take in the first year is limited. For more information on distribution limits go here.


What happens if I outlive the loan? Will I have to repay the lender?


No. As long as one of the borrowers on the loan note lives in the home, continues to pay the taxes and insurance and maintains the home in good condition, you will not need to repay the loan. Once the last surviving borrower passes away, the home is sold or the obligations of the loan are not met, the loan must be repaid.


Must my house be paid off for me to qualify for a reverse mortgage?


No. You do not need to pay off your home to qualify. However, the loan proceeds you receive from a reverse mortgage must be used to pay off the existing mortgage or liens (if there is a mortgage balance owing). You will continue to hold title to your home.


Do I have to pay taxes on the cash payments I receive?


The cash or proceeds you receive from a reverse mortgage typically is not subject to individual income taxation. But, since you hold the title to your home, you are still responsible for property taxes, insurance, utilities, fuel, maintenance, and other home-related expenses. Interest on reverse mortgages is not deductible on income tax returns until the loan is paid off in part or whole.We sugest you consult with your tax advisor to provide guidance for your particular situation.


How will this loan affect my estate and how much will be left to my heirs?


Once the last surviving borrower dies, sells your home, or no longer resides there as the primary residence, you or your estate is responsible for repayment of the money you received from the reverse mortgage, plus interest and other fees. Any remaining equity belongs to either you or your heirs. A “non-recourse” clause can prevent either you or your estate from being responsible for more than the value of your home when the loan is repaid.


Should I use an estate planning service to find a reverse mortgage?


HUD advises against using any service that charges a fee (except required HECM counseling) or any service that requests a lender referral fee, to obtain a reverse mortgage. HUD provides this information free of charge and can direct you to HUD-approved housing agencies that offer approved reverse mortgage counseling or additional services that are free or have a minimal cost. There is typically a reverse mortgage (HECM) counseling fee of up to $125. If the borrower cannot afford this fee some counseling agencies will waive the fee for qualified applicants. You can find a HUD-approved housing counseling agency near you by calling 1-800-569-4287 toll free.


How do I receive my payments?


Reverse mortgage payments can be received in one of five ways:


    • Tenure: equal monthly payments

    • Term: equal monthly payments for a fixed period of months as decided by the borrower

    • Line of Credit: payments made in installments or at various times and in amounts dictated by the borrower(s)

    • Modified Tenure: monthly payments with a line of credit

    • Modified Term: monthly payments for a fixed period of months with a line of credit

    21 “Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories


    If you need help in planning for and/or dealing with this issue or with any Elder Care / Senior Care matter, you can find the professional help you need in one of the following 21Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories. These Elder Care / Senior Care – specific Directories are sponsored by the National ElderCare Matters Alliance, an organization of thousands of America’s TOP Elder Care / Senior Care Professsionals who help families plan for and deal with a wide range of Elder Care Matters.




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    Today"s Elder Care / Senior Care Q&A for Monday 2/8/2016

    This Week's Elder Care / Senior Care Article

    TITLE: Are Smaller Inheritances a New Trend?


    Written by:


    Inheritances

    Scott A. Makuakane, Esq., CFP

    Est8Planning Counsel LLLC

    Honolulu, Hawaii
    An ElderCare Matters Partner & Hawaii State Coordinator




    Due to demographic changes and changing economic fortunes, older Americans increasingly have to transfer money to their adult children to help support those children. Barron’s, in a recent article titled “Boomers Spend Their Kids’ Inheritance – On Supporting Them,” reports that intra-family transfers have increased significantly in the last few years.


    The article is a good read for anyone interested in retirement and demographic trends.


    For estate planning purposes, this trend could create some issues. For starters, if the money is being spent now, then it obviously cannot be part of the estate later and children might receive smaller inheritances than they are expecting.


    What if one child receives more support from the parents while they were alive than another child? This could lead to bitterness and even fighting over the estate. This is likely to happen if the estate plan divides what is left between the children equally, even though one or more children received money along the way.


    Parents who are helping to support their adult children now should speak with an experienced estate planning attorney about what that means for their estate plan.


    No parent wants a family feud as his or her legacy.





    21 “Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories


    If you need help in planning for and/or dealing with your estate plan or with any Elder Care / Senior Care issue, you can find the professional help you need in one of the following 21Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories. These Elder Care / Senior Care – specific Directories are sponsored by the National ElderCare Matters Alliance, an organization of thousands of America’s TOP Elder Care / Senior Care Professsionals who help families plan for and deal with a wide range of Elder Care Matters.


    1. ElderCareMatters.com

    2. ElderCareMattersBlog.com

    3. ElderCareWebsites.com

    4. ElderCareAnswers.us

    5. ElderCareArticles.us

    6. ElderCareProfessionals.us

    7. ElderLawAttorneys.us

    8. EstatePlanningAttorneys.us

    9. FindDailyMoneyManagers.net

    10. FindElderCareMediators.net

    11. FindElderLawAttorneys.net

    12. FindEstatePlanningAttorneys.net

    13. FindGeriatricCareManagers.net

    14. FindHomeCareProviders.net

    15. FindLongTermCareInsurance.net

    16. FindMedicaidAttorneys.net

    17. FindProbateAttorneys.net

    18. FindSeniorLivingCommunities.net

    19. FindSeniorMoveManagers.net

    20. FindSpecialNeedsAttorneys.net

    21. FindVAAccreditedAttorneys.net

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    This Week"s Elder Care / Senior Care Article