Thursday, January 21, 2016

This Week's Elder Care / Senior Care Article

TITLE:  Special Needs Trusts


Written by:


Special Needs Trusts

Sheri R. Abrams, Esq.

Sheri R. Abrams, Attorney at Law

Oakton, Virginia
An ElderCare Matters Partner 


Why Would Someone Need a Special Needs Trust?


Many well-intentioned parents don’t realize that an inheritance may cause many problems for their disabled or special needs child.


Under current Federal law, any inheritance of more than $2,000 disqualifies individuals with disabilities from most federal needs based assistance, including Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Medicaid. Benefits from state public assistance programs may also be affected.


A Special Needs Trust, however, offers a means of protecting your child’s eligibility for these benefits, while addressing the ongoing care and needs of your disabled or special needs child.


What are the Advantages of a Special Needs Trust?


The primary advantage a Special Needs Trust offers over a direct gift or inheritance is that, if arranged properly, the assets in the trust do not actually belong to the beneficiary. In this way, the trust can provide benefits to an individual but not cause the individual who has a disability to be disqualified from government programs.


A Special Needs Trust holds title to property for the benefit of a child or adult who has a disability.


The Special Needs Trust can be used to provide for the needs of a person with a disability and to supplement benefits received from various governmental assistance programs.


Special Needs Trusts typically provide for:


– medical and dental expenses;


– eye glasses;


– annual independent check-ups;


– transportation (including vehicle purchase);


– equipment;


– training programs;


– maintenance;


– education;


– insurance (including payment of premiums);


– rehabilitation; and


– essential dietary needs.


Special Needs Trusts also may allow a trustee to give the beneficiary money for:


– various forms of entertainment (e.g., movies);


– electronic equipment;


– trips and vacations;


– computer equipment;


– athletic training and competitions;


– companion services/home health aide; and


– other items to enhance self-esteem.


A trust can hold cash, stocks, personal property, and real property. It can own and/or be the beneficiary of life insurance.


Special Needs Trusts also can be used to protect personal injury settlements or judgments from jeopardizing government benefit eligibility.


Most importantly, Special Needs Trusts can help parents coordinate their estate plans and provide peace of mind that their child will be provided for.


An Attorney with knowledge of Special Needs Trusts can assist parents, family members or friends


establish a Special Needs Trust, during their lifetime or by a Will, for a disabled person without risking that person’s eligibility for public benefits


An Experienced Attorney can also establish an Special Needs Trust for the benefit of a disabled person using that person’s own funds – without incurring a penalty period for Medicaid.


21 “Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories


If you need help in planning for and/or dealing with long-term care or with any Elder Care / Senior Care issue, you can find the professional help you need in one of the following 21Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories. These Elder Care / Senior Care – specific Directories are sponsored by the National ElderCare Matters Alliance, an organization of thousands of America’s TOP Elder Care / Senior Care Professsionals who help families plan for and deal with a wide range of Elder Care Matters.


  1. ElderCareMatters.com

  2. ElderCareMattersBlog.com

  3. ElderCareWebsites.com

  4. ElderCareAnswers.us

  5. ElderCareArticles.us

  6. ElderCareProfessionals.us

  7. ElderLawAttorneys.us

  8. EstatePlanningAttorneys.us

  9. FindDailyMoneyManagers.net

  10. FindElderCareMediators.net

  11. FindElderLawAttorneys.net

  12. FindEstatePlanningAttorneys.net

  13. FindGeriatricCareManagers.net

  14. FindHomeCareProviders.net

  15. FindLongTermCareInsurance.net

  16. FindMedicaidAttorneys.net

  17. FindProbateAttorneys.net

  18. FindSeniorLivingCommunities.net

  19. FindSeniorMoveManagers.net

  20. FindSpecialNeedsAttorneys.net

  21. FindVAAccreditedAttorneys.net

#SpecialNeedsPlanning, #SpecialNeeds, #findSpecialNeedsAttorneys, #eldercare, #seniorcare, #eldercarematters, #seniorcarematters, #eldercarearticles, #seniorcarearticles, #elderlawarticles, #elderlawanswers, #elderlawattorneys, #findelderlawattorneys, #SpecialNeedsArticles



This Week"s Elder Care / Senior Care Article

Tuesday, January 12, 2016

Today’s Elder Care / Senior Care Q&A for Tuesday, 1/12/2016

QUESTION: Should I put all of my assets in joint tenancy?


Answered by:
Joint Tenancy

John J. Campbell, Esq., CELA

Law Offices of John J. Campbell, P.C.

Denver, Colorado
An ElderCare Matters Partner


ANSWER: No! There are times when titling a particular item of property in joint tenancy makes sense.  However, putting all your assets in joint tenancy, especially without proper planning, can be disastrous. Your joint tenant isn’t just a signer, he or she owns an undivided one-half (½) of your assets. Nothing prevents a joint tenant from clearing out all of your bank account; and nothing prevents a creditor of your joint tenant from executing judgments against your joint tenant’s interest in your property. Putting your assets in joint tenancy will not protect them from Medicaid and certainly won’t solve your estate planning issues. If your will says “leave everything to my daughter,” but your assets are in joint tenancy (with right of survivorship) with your son, then your son will take everything when you die; not your daughter.


21 “Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories


If you need help in planning for and/or dealing with this issue or with any Elder Care / Senior Care matter, you can find the professional help you need in one of the following 21Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories. These Elder Care / Senior Care – specific Directories are sponsored by the National ElderCare Matters Alliance, an organization of thousands of America’s TOP Elder Care / Senior Care Professsionals who help families plan for and deal with a wide range of Elder Care Matters.




#eldercarematters, #eldercare, #eldercareanswers, #seniorcareanswers,  #eldercaredirectories, #seniorcaredirectories, #findseniorcareprofessionals, #findseniorcareexperts, #elderlawanswers, #seniorcare, #seniorcarematters, #estateplanning, #estateplanningattorneys, #findestateplanningattorneys



Today’s Elder Care / Senior Care Q&A for Tuesday, 1/12/2016

Monday, January 11, 2016

This Week's Elder Care / Senior Care Article

TITLE: Medical and Pension Veterans Benefits


Written by:
What Medical and Pension Benefits Are Available to Veterans?

Don L. Rosenberg, Attorney andCounselor

Barron, Rosenberg, Mayoras & Mayoras, P.C.

Troy, Michigan
An ElderCare Matters Partner


Veterans, as well as spouses and dependents, may be eligible for a variety of medical and pension benefits. If you or a loved one is a veteran, it is important to be aware of these benefits and know if you are eligible.


Medical Care Veterans Benefits



The VA provides medical care benefits to veterans. The standard medical benefit package includes preventative care services, outpatient and outpatient diagnostic and treatment services (including mental health and substance abuse treatment), prescriptions, and long-term care, which can include nursing home care for eligible veterans.


To be eligible for medical benefits, most veterans must be enrolled in the VA health system. Those veterans who need not be enrolled in the VA health system to qualify for medical care benefits are:


    • 50 percent or more disabled due to a service-connected disability

    • seeking care for a VA rated, service-connected disability

    • discharged for a disability less than a year ago that the military determined was caused or worsened by your service, but the disability is not yet rated by the VA.

 


The VA considers a number of factors to determine whether or not a veteran is eligible. To qualify, the veteran must not have been dishonorably discharged. Length of service is also one factor. In general, you must have served a continuous 24-month period of active duty military service. There are many exceptions to this, including for reservists, national guard members, service-related disabilities, and hardship discharges. Other factors include whether or not the veteran has service-related disability, what the veteran’s income level is, and what VA resources are available.


Disability Veterans Benefits


The VA offers two major disability-related benefit programs: disability compensation and disability pension.


Disability Compensation


Disability compensation benefits are available for veterans suffering from service-connected disabilities. This means that you are 10% or more disabled from an injury or disease was incurred or aggravated while on active duty, active duty training, or inactive duty training. Amount of compensation depends on the degree of disability. Veterans may also receive benefits for diseases or conditions that are secondary to service-connected conditions or for diseases or conditions that may be presumed to be from service even if they occur after service is complete.


The compensation you receive is based on compensation rates set out by the VA. Compensation is between 10% and 100% depending on severity. If you are 30% or more disabled and you have dependents, then you may qualify for an additional allowance.


Disability Pension


The VA pension is available to low-income veterans. It is available to the veteran, veteran’s spouse, and children. For this pension, your injury or disease need not be service-connected.


In order to be eligible, the veteran must meet certain requirements. The veteran must have served 90 days of active duty service, with at least one day of wartime service. If you entered active duty after September 7, 1980, you must have served 24 months or the full period you were called into active duty, with at least one day of wartime service.


In addition, to be eligible, you must meet one of the following — you must be either at least 65 years old, permanently and totally disabled, a patient in a nursing home requiring skilled nursing care, receiving Social Security Disability Insurance, or receiving Supplemental Security Income.


Your annual family income must be less than the limit Congress set. Countable income includes earnings, disability / retirement payments, annuity interest and dividend payments, and net income from farming or business. Net worth includes bank accounts, stocks, bonds, mutual funds, annuities, and property other than residence and reasonable lot area. If you qualify for the disability pension, then you would receive the difference between countable income and the annually set pension limit.


Aid and Attendance


This is a veteran’s pension benefit program available to veterans and their families. The program is available to help with unreimbursed home health and medical costs and the unreimbursed cost of assisted living.

There are four requirement prongs that must be met to qualify for Aid and Attendance. This benefit can be the difference for a Veteran or the widow of a Veteran from having to go to a nursing home or staying at home or in assisted living. The yearly benefit for a Veteran can be as much as $21,000 and a widow of a Veteran almost $14,000. All benefits are income tax free.


Service Prong — The Veteran must have served in the active military, navy or air service: (1) for 90 consecutive days or more during a period of wartime, (2) during a period of war was discharged under conditions other than dishonorable or released from such service for a service-connected disability, (3) for a period of 90 consecutive days or more and such a period began or ended during a period of war; or (4) for an aggregate of 90 days or more in two separate periods of service during more than one period of war.


Disability Prong — The applicant need not have a service-connected condition, but must be “permanently and totally disabled”, meaning the veteran needs “care or assistance” on a “regular basis” from another person which protects him or her from “dangers of a daily living environment”. There are many ways to sufficiently show this including being blind, living in an assisted living facility, needing adjustment or attendance to prosthetics or orthopedic appliances, being unable to dress or clean oneself, or has a serious mental or physical incapacity that requires regular assistance. However, the VA presumes “disability” for individuals over the age of 65. Furthermore, the veteran or a widow of a veteran must need assistance with at least two activities of daily living, such as eating, bathing, dressing, transferring and toileting or being cognitively impaired.


Asset Prong — The VA pension benefit is a needs based benefit, and while there is no hard and fast rule, we recommend the surviving spouse should not have more than $40,000.00 plus a home and a car. Before you or loved ones think about transferring assets or doing any other planning, you should consult with one of our estate planning and elder law attorneys. Improper transfers can affect Medicaid eligibility.


Income Prong — The basic rule is one’s unreimbursed medical expenses have to exceed or equal their income to qualify for the full benefit amount. If not, then the veteran could receive a partial benefit. If one does not have actual medical expenses payable to a third party there can be a way to establish a care contract between family members that will qualify as a medical expense.


Determining what benefits you qualify for can get overwhelming, but remember that it can be relieving as well. If you qualify for VA benefits, you should find out as soon as possible so that you can properly undertake veterans planning.



21 “Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories


If you need help in planning for and/or dealing with long-term care or with any Elder Care / Senior Care issue, you can find the professional help you need in one of the following 21Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories. These Elder Care / Senior Care – specific Directories are sponsored by the National ElderCare Matters Alliance, an organization of thousands of America’s TOP Elder Care / Senior Care Professsionals who help families plan for and deal with a wide range of Elder Care Matters.


  1. ElderCareMatters.com

  2. ElderCareMattersBlog.com

  3. ElderCareWebsites.com

  4. ElderCareAnswers.us

  5. ElderCareArticles.us

  6. ElderCareProfessionals.us

  7. ElderLawAttorneys.us

  8. EstatePlanningAttorneys.us

  9. FindDailyMoneyManagers.net

  10. FindElderCareMediators.net

  11. FindElderLawAttorneys.net

  12. FindEstatePlanningAttorneys.net

  13. FindGeriatricCareManagers.net

  14. FindHomeCareProviders.net

  15. FindLongTermCareInsurance.net

  16. FindMedicaidAttorneys.net

  17. FindProbateAttorneys.net

  18. FindSeniorLivingCommunities.net

  19. FindSeniorMoveManagers.net

  20. FindSpecialNeedsAttorneys.net

  21. FindVAAccreditedAttorneys.net

#veteransplanning, #veteransbenefits, #findVAAccreditedAttorneys, #eldercare, #seniorcare, #eldercarematters, #seniorcarematters, #eldercarearticles, #seniorcarearticles, #elderlawarticles, #elderlawanswers, #elderlawattorneys, #findelderlawattorneys



This Week"s Elder Care / Senior Care Article

Thursday, January 7, 2016

Today's Elder Care / Senior Care Q&A for Thursday, 1/7/2016

QUESTION: How long is a will valid?


Answered by:
will

Michelle Wilson, Esq.

Wilson Legal, PC

Cumming, Georgia
An ElderCare Matters Partner


ANSWER: The mere passage of time has no effect on the validity of the will. Individuals and families experience life changes every 2 to 5 years. So even though a will remains valid, the individual and family’s needs change. Tax laws and statutes controlling wills and trusts change as well. – Your estate plan – whether it’s a will or trust – should generally be reviewed every 2 to 3 years and more often if you have a major life change such as the birth or adoption of a child, a divorce or marriage, or a significant increase in assets. – Legally, a will does not take effect until the testator dies and the probate court approves the will. Prior to death, a competent testator can amend or revoke an existing will. No notice to or approval of the beneficiaries is required. – You can change your will by writing and signing a new will or signing an amendment to the will called a “codicil”. A codicil is a separate document that explains the changes to the will and you make it effective by using the same formalities as with a will.


21 “Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories


If you need help in planning for and/or dealing with this issue or with any Elder Care / Senior Care matter, you can find the professional help you need in one of the following 21Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories. These Elder Care / Senior Care – specific Directories are sponsored by the National ElderCare Matters Alliance, an organization of thousands of America’s TOP Elder Care / Senior Care Professsionals who help families plan for and deal with a wide range of Elder Care Matters.




#eldercarematters, #eldercare, #eldercareanswers, #seniorcareanswers,  #eldercaredirectories, #seniorcaredirectories, #findseniorcareprofessionals, #findseniorcareexperts, #elderlawanswers, #seniorcare, #seniorcarematters



Today"s Elder Care / Senior Care Q&A for Thursday, 1/7/2016

Wednesday, January 6, 2016

Today's Elder Care / Senior Care Q&A for Wednesday, 1/6/2016

QUESTION: What is ONE important New Year’s Resolution that Everyone should make regarding Estate Planning?


Answered by:
beneficiary designation

Stephen J. Silverberg, Esq., CELA

Law Office of Stephen J. Silverberg

Roslyn Heights, New York
An ElderCare Matters Partner


ANSWER:  One simple New Year’s Resolution that EVERYONE should make regarding Estate Planning is to Check Their Beneficiary Designations.


Many people fail to change the beneficiaries named in their IRA or retirement plans. If you have been divorced and especially if you’ve remarried, don’t give your ex your hard-earned retirement savings. Make sure the beneficiaries on your retirement accounts are up-to-date.


If you’re married, you’ll want to designate your spouse as the primary beneficiary. Federal law requires your surviving spouse to be the primary beneficiary in employer-sponsored retirement plans, like a 401(k), unless your spouse signs a written waiver letting you name someone else as the primary beneficiary. In most cases, spouses will name each other as the primary beneficiaries to their retirement plans. Those funds help maintain the lifestyle they’ve enjoyed in the marriage.


The big tax advantage of doing this is that a spouse can transfer the IRA or plan into his or her name without have to pay any taxes, which will further maintain the plan’s tax deferral status.


Retirement assets that pass between husband and wife at death don’t create a taxable event. So the surviving spouse as the beneficiary is free to use the inherited funds as they want after their spouse’s death. Be aware that your spouse might remarry and thereafter name a new spouse as the primary beneficiary instead of your children.


Unfortunately, many folks think that designating their estate or trust beneficiary of their retirement plans is enough to be safe. Not so. If the estate is the beneficiary, you can set up an expensive legal mess for the people you really intend to be the beneficiaries.


Don’t let a judge make the decision. If you are set on having a trust as a beneficiary, make sure that you speak with your estate planning attorney to be certain that the language in the trust will provide your heirs with the benefits legally available.


To ensure that the right people in your life receive the benefits of your hard work, take the time to review the beneficiary designations on all of your retirement plans, IRAs, investment accounts, insurance policies and any other assets that ask you to name a beneficiary.


21 “Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories


If you need help in planning for and/or dealing with this issue or with any Elder Care / Senior Care matter, you can find the professional help you need in one of the following 21Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories. These Elder Care / Senior Care – specific Directories are sponsored by the National ElderCare Matters Alliance, an organization of thousands of America’s TOP Elder Care / Senior Care Professsionals who help families plan for and deal with a wide range of Elder Care Matters.




#eldercarematters, #eldercare, #eldercareanswers, #seniorcareanswers,  #eldercaredirectories, #seniorcaredirectories, #findseniorcareprofessionals, #findseniorcareexperts



Today"s Elder Care / Senior Care Q&A for Wednesday, 1/6/2016

Tuesday, January 5, 2016

Today's Elder Care / Senior Care Q&A for Tuesday, 1/5/2016

QUESTION: What are some things we should keep in mind when dealing with funeral and burial planning issues?


Answered by:
funeral and burial planning

Don L. Rosenberg, Attorney and Counselor

Barron, Rosenberg, Mayoras & Mayoras, P.C.

Troy, Michigan
An ElderCare Matters Partner


ANSWER: When a loved one passes away, family and friends feel stricken with grief and loss. During this difficult time, figuring out how to handle the deceased’s estate and carry out their wishes can be an overwhelming burden. One of the smartest things you can do for your family is to make burial and funeral arrangements in advance. When an individual passes away without leaving behind a plan expressing their wishes, surviving family members may bicker, stymieing progress.


Planning ahead while you are still living ensures not only that your wishes will be carried out to your satisfaction, but it also will limit problems for your family after you pass on. Planning for burial and funeral arrangements means anything from picking an individual who will carry out your wishes, deciding whether you want a ceremony or not and how that will be carried out, choosing burial or cremation, and deciding how funeral and burial expenses will be paid.


Michigan Funeral and Burial Default Rules and Appointing a Representative


Michigan has no law allowing an individual to designate another person to carry out funeral and burial wishes. However, you should still choose someone and document your wishes clearly in writing. Family members will be more likely to honor your wishes, and if there is any dispute, a court will be more likely to honor your wishes as well. Furthermore, keep in mind that if one wants to be cremated, then all of the closest next of kin have to agree or the cremation will not occur.


If you do not plan ahead at all, however, the state will apply the default rules to choose a representative. State default rules choose a decision maker as follows:


    • Surviving spouse

    • Adult children

    • Siblings

    • Grandparents

    • Next of kin (next closest degree of consanguinity)

    • Personal representative of deceased’s estate

    • Personal guardian

    • Special personal representative

    • Designated public official

Upon first glance, this default order seems sensible enough. But what if your children do not get along? When there is more than one member to a class, majority rules. If there is no majority, then they would likely go to court to sort out their differences. Or what if you never got along with your siblings, and you would have much preferred that your cousin make decisions for your funeral and burial? Anything could happen between now and the date of your passing. People you thought would be around to take care of your final wishes might predecease you. To avoid these problems, it is best if you set out an explicit plan in advance.Before creating a plan, find an experienced attorney to draft your final wishes properly. Some people think they can designate a person to handle funeral and burial matters within a will. However, the funeral and burial or cremation typically happens before a court reviews the will. This means your wishes may not get carried out.A better approach is to draft a separate document that only deals with your preferences surrounding funeral and burial arrangements.You should decide whether you would like to be buried in a casket or cremated. Decide what will happen to your ashes. Choose a casket and where you would like to be buried. Make decisions about what kind of funeral ceremony, if any, you would like to have. Budget the expenses so your wishes can be fulfilled regarding the remainder of your estate.


21 “Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories


If you need help in planning for and/or dealing with this issue or with any Elder Care / Senior Care matter, you can find the professional help you need in one of the following 21Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories. These Elder Care / Senior Care – specific Directories are sponsored by the National ElderCare Matters Alliance, an organization of thousands of America’s TOP Elder Care / Senior Care Professsionals who help families plan for and deal with a wide range of Elder Care Matters.




#eldercarematters, #eldercare, #eldercareanswers, #seniorcareanswers,  #eldercaredirectories, #seniorcaredirectories, #findseniorcareprofessionals, #findseniorcareexperts



Today"s Elder Care / Senior Care Q&A for Tuesday, 1/5/2016

Monday, January 4, 2016

This Week's Elder Care / Senior Care Article:

TITLE: Four Myths About Medicaid’s Long-Term Care Coverage


Written by:
Medicaid

Ronald A. Fatoullah, Esq., CELA

Ronald Fatoullah & Associates

Great Neck, New York
An ElderCare Matters Partner


Long-term care is not cheap. The cost of employing a home care attendant in the New York City area ranges from $15 to $25 an hour and a nursing home bed runs from approximately $12,000 to $15,000 per month. Finding the right solution to help pay for long-term care is critical. While Medicare gets most of the news coverage, Medicaid still remains a mystery to many individuals. The fact is that Medicaid is the largest source for funding nursing home care. However, there are many myths about exactly who qualifies for Medicaid and what coverage it provides. Here are four myths about funding long-term care.


Myth #1: Medicare will cover my nursing home expenses.


While Medicare does provide some coverage for nursing home expenses, the coverage is quite limited and is not long-term. Medicare covers only up to 100 days of “skilled nursing care” per spell of illness, of which only 80 days are fully covered. The patient must start paying a copayment of $148 per day (as of 2013) from the 21st to the 100th day unless he or she has supplemental insurance that will cover the copayment. To qualify for Medicare, the patient must enter a Medicare-approved “skilled nursing facility” or nursing home within 30 days of a hospital stay that lasted at least three days, and the care in the nursing home must be for the same condition.


Myth #2: You need to be poor to qualify for Medicaid.


Medicaid helps needy individuals pay for long-term care, but you do not need to be completely destitute to qualify. Generally, as of 2013, an individual is allowed to have up to $14,400 in assets and up to $820 in monthly income to qualify for Medicaid. In addition, retirement accounts of any amount in payout status are exempt in New York State. However, eligibility for Medicaid is not that cut and dried and often depends on the facts of each case. The rules vary depending on whether an individual is looking for “Community Medicaid”, which covers home care costs, or “Institutional Medicaid”, which covers nursing home costs. Eligibility is also different when the applicant has a spouse. Potential applicants or caregivers are strongly encouraged to explore with an elder law attorney the possibility of qualifying for Medicaid in order to help defray the cost of long-term care.


Myth #3: A prenuptial agreement will protect my assets from being counted if my spouse needs Medicaid.


A prenuptial agreement only works to keep property separate in the event of death or divorce. It does not keep property separate for purposes of Medicaid eligibility. However, a “sick spouse” may still be eligible for Medicaid even if the “well spouse” has assets. A “well spouse” should explore the eligibility rules with an elder law attorney.


Myth #4: I can give away up to $14,000 a year under Medicaid rules.


The rule that allows gifting up to $14,000 per year is an Internal Revenue Service (IRS) rule, NOT a Medicaid rule. The IRS allows an individual to gift up to $14,000 a year without incurring any gift tax liability. However, under Medicaid rules, a gift of $14,000 or any other significant amount will trigger a penalty period. This means that for approximately every $11,000 gifted within the 5 year period before a nursing home Medicaid application is filed, Medicaid will not cover the applicant for one month. It is important to note that there is no penalty period on transfers of assets for community-based Medicaid eligibility.


Dispelling the above myths should encourage individuals or their caregivers to explore Medicaid as an option to paying for long-term care. Medicaid is definitely a viable alternative for many of us and is commonly used. However, the rules are complex and it is critical to consult with your elder law attorney to ensure no stone is left unturned.


21 “Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories


If you need help in planning for and/or dealing with long-term care or with any Elder Care / Senior Care issue, you can find the professional help you need in one of the following 21Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories. These Elder Care / Senior Care – specific Directories are sponsored by the National ElderCare Matters Alliance, an organization of thousands of America’s TOP Elder Care / Senior Care Professsionals who help families plan for and deal with a wide range of Elder Care Matters.


  1. ElderCareMatters.com

  2. ElderCareMattersBlog.com

  3. ElderCareWebsites.com

  4. ElderCareAnswers.us

  5. ElderCareArticles.us

  6. ElderCareProfessionals.us

  7. ElderLawAttorneys.us

  8. EstatePlanningAttorneys.us

  9. FindDailyMoneyManagers.net

  10. FindElderCareMediators.net

  11. FindElderLawAttorneys.net

  12. FindEstatePlanningAttorneys.net

  13. FindGeriatricCareManagers.net

  14. FindHomeCareProviders.net

  15. FindLongTermCareInsurance.net

  16. FindMedicaidAttorneys.net

  17. FindProbateAttorneys.net

  18. FindSeniorLivingCommunities.net

  19. FindSeniorMoveManagers.net

  20. FindSpecialNeedsAttorneys.net

  21. FindVAAccreditedAttorneys.net

#medicaid, #Medicaidattorneys, #findMedicaidattorneys, #eldercare, #seniorcare, #eldercarematters, #seniorcarematters, #eldercarearticles, #seniorcarearticles, #elderlawarticles, #elderlawanswers, #elderlawattorneys, #findelderlawattorneys, #longtermcare, #Medicare



This Week"s Elder Care / Senior Care Article: